The 12th censored story of 1983

revealed how the invasion of Grenada provided a case study of governmental censorship. The American people were misinformed or denied information before, during, and after the invasion.

     For the first time in history, the U.S. government denied press access to a major U.S. military armed conflict. It literally censored all news about the invasion for more than 48 hours. One foreign journalist reported, “We have just seen the end of 200 years of press freedom in the United States.”

     Grenada, possibly already forgotten by some Americans at the time of this writing in 2009, will go into the history books as a classic example of governmental censorship in a free and democratic society.

      

 

REPORTED IN 2009:

ASSOCIATED PRESS CEO URGES BETTER PRESS ACCESS TO MILITARY OPS

 

     On February 6, 2009, Tom Curley, CEO of The Associated Press, “called on the news industry to negotiate with the U.S. military on a new set of rules for independent reporting in war zones.” He charged that “The Bush administration turned the U.S. military into a global propaganda machine while imposing tough restrictions on journalists seeking to give the public truthful reports about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.”

     Of course, Mr. Curley, this is what Project Censored was warning you and the rest of the media about back in 1983 when then President Ronald Reagan, “the great communicator,” brought an end to 200 years of press freedom in the United States.

    

 

Those who cannot remember the past

are condemned to repeat it!

— George Santayana