http://kfor.com/2017/04/03/police-mom-abandoned-infant-in-yard-overnight-after-drugs-made-her-paranoid/

LAKEWOOD, Wash. – A mother was arrested after admitting she abandoned her 3-month-old in the yard of a Washington home Sunday night during a drug-induced bout of paranoia, said police Monday.

Lakewood Police Lt. Chris Lawler said authorities found the child after a woman walking home around 1:30 a.m. Monday thought she heard a distressed animal.

Instead, she found an infant boy lying in the grass of a Lakewood residence, Lawler said.

Investigators said the baby was cold but, otherwise, in good health.

He was taken to a local hospital and placed in protective state custody.

Lawler said a female patient at St. Clare Hospital later told officials there she was the child’s mother.

“The mother told detectives that she was at a Lakewood residence last night and did some drugs, which made her paranoid,” said a Lakewood police news release. “She said she grabbed her baby and ran from the residence because she thought she was being chased. She admitted to leaving the baby in a front yard and hoping someone would find him. She was later found running around the area of 74th and Tyler at 7:07 a.m. and transported to St. Clare for medical treatment.”

While detectives were interviewing the mom, the father of the child showed up at the hospital.

He said he last saw his child with his wife Sunday night when he left because he was arguing with her.

He said he didn’t know the child had been abandoned.

The child’s mother was booked into Pierce County jail for second-degree abandonment of a dependent person.

The father was booked into jail for an outstanding misdemeanor arrest warrant, police said.

Officials haven’t identified either of the parents pending official charges.

http://kfor.com/2017/04/03/police-mom-abandoned-infant-in-yard-overnight-after-drugs-made-her-paranoid/

LAKEWOOD, Wash. – A mother was arrested after admitting she abandoned her 3-month-old in the yard of a Washington home Sunday night during a drug-induced bout of paranoia, said police Monday.

Lakewood Police Lt. Chris Lawler said authorities found the child after a woman walking home around 1:30 a.m. Monday thought she heard a distressed animal.

Instead, she found an infant boy lying in the grass of a Lakewood residence, Lawler said.

Investigators said the baby was cold but, otherwise, in good health.

He was taken to a local hospital and placed in protective state custody.

Lawler said a female patient at St. Clare Hospital later told officials there she was the child’s mother.

“The mother told detectives that she was at a Lakewood residence last night and did some drugs, which made her paranoid,” said a Lakewood police news release. “She said she grabbed her baby and ran from the residence because she thought she was being chased. She admitted to leaving the baby in a front yard and hoping someone would find him. She was later found running around the area of 74th and Tyler at 7:07 a.m. and transported to St. Clare for medical treatment.”

While detectives were interviewing the mom, the father of the child showed up at the hospital.

He said he last saw his child with his wife Sunday night when he left because he was arguing with her.

He said he didn’t know the child had been abandoned.

The child’s mother was booked into Pierce County jail for second-degree abandonment of a dependent person.

The father was booked into jail for an outstanding misdemeanor arrest warrant, police said.

Officials haven’t identified either of the parents pending official charges.

http://kfor.com/2017/04/03/holey-i-40-bridge-that-snarled-traffic-has-history-of-problems-scheduled-to-be-replaced-next-year/

DEL CITY, Oklahoma – It could be at least a year before the state can get around to replacing a bad bridge that continues to plague drivers, including rush hour traffic Monday afternoon.

A hole opened up in the westbound lanes of I-40 over Crutcho Creek at some point Monday morning.

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation narrowed traffic down to one lane in order to patch the hole until shortly after 5 p.m.

The bridge, built in 1960 at a time the interstate system was in its infancy, is no stranger to ODOT.

But, the agency has been resigned to keeping the bridge in working order with emergency repairs, until its scheduled replacement sometime next year.

Not long after the bridge was built, the Del City Library moved into the nearby community center in 1966.

Librarian Susan Hutchins wasn’t there at the time, but she is now, helping people navigate the past.

“It’s not just books,” Hutchins said of the library. “It’s programs. It’s computers.”

As the library has kept up with the times, Hutchins said it’s clear the bridge – that carries between 80,000 to 100,000 of vehicles a day – just 200 yards away has not.

“We can’t really see the bridge,” she said, talking near a window on the east side of the building. “But, I know it has problems.”

But, the problem will take time and money.

“We don’t have a lot of (money), for maintenance-type work,” said Cody Boyd, an ODOT spokesperson. “Which is why we’re having to do reactive maintenance, which is waiting until the hole actually forms.”

This isn’t the first time a hole in the bridge has opened up; NewsChannel 4 has done multiple stories about the issue.

The last time crews were out repairing the bridge was February.

Walking below the bridge, along the bike path, you can see exposed re-bar, crumbling concrete, plywood and old street signs used on the bridge deck’s underside to provide backing for the concrete patching from above.

Boyd said the type of work will likely continue until the bridge and nearby Southeast 15th Street bridge can be replaced, a $31 million project slated for 2018.

The design phase is complete, but Boyd said one area of concern is if the agency will face additional budget cuts from the state, considering Oklahoma’s current financial situation.

“That’s why it’s just patchwork, on top of patchwork, on top of patchwork,” Boyd said. “Keep it in good enough condition until we can make it to major reconstruction, and that is the answer for this bridge – to be totally replaced.”

35.442006
-97.440870

http://kfor.com/2017/04/03/holey-i-40-bridge-that-snarled-traffic-has-history-of-problems-scheduled-to-be-replaced-next-year/

DEL CITY, Oklahoma – It could be at least a year before the state can get around to replacing a bad bridge that continues to plague drivers, including rush hour traffic Monday afternoon.

A hole opened up in the westbound lanes of I-40 over Crutcho Creek at some point Monday morning.

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation narrowed traffic down to one lane in order to patch the hole until shortly after 5 p.m.

The bridge, built in 1960 at a time the interstate system was in its infancy, is no stranger to ODOT.

But, the agency has been resigned to keeping the bridge in working order with emergency repairs, until its scheduled replacement sometime next year.

Not long after the bridge was built, the Del City Library moved into the nearby community center in 1966.

Librarian Susan Hutchins wasn’t there at the time, but she is now, helping people navigate the past.

“It’s not just books,” Hutchins said of the library. “It’s programs. It’s computers.”

As the library has kept up with the times, Hutchins said it’s clear the bridge – that carries between 80,000 to 100,000 of vehicles a day – just 200 yards away has not.

“We can’t really see the bridge,” she said, talking near a window on the east side of the building. “But, I know it has problems.”

But, the problem will take time and money.

“We don’t have a lot of (money), for maintenance-type work,” said Cody Boyd, an ODOT spokesperson. “Which is why we’re having to do reactive maintenance, which is waiting until the hole actually forms.”

This isn’t the first time a hole in the bridge has opened up; NewsChannel 4 has done multiple stories about the issue.

The last time crews were out repairing the bridge was February.

Walking below the bridge, along the bike path, you can see exposed re-bar, crumbling concrete, plywood and old street signs used on the bridge deck’s underside to provide backing for the concrete patching from above.

Boyd said the type of work will likely continue until the bridge and nearby Southeast 15th Street bridge can be replaced, a $31 million project slated for 2018.

The design phase is complete, but Boyd said one area of concern is if the agency will face additional budget cuts from the state, considering Oklahoma’s current financial situation.

“That’s why it’s just patchwork, on top of patchwork, on top of patchwork,” Boyd said. “Keep it in good enough condition until we can make it to major reconstruction, and that is the answer for this bridge – to be totally replaced.”

35.442006
-97.440870

http://kfor.com/2017/04/03/holey-i-40-bridge-that-snarled-traffic-has-history-of-problems-scheduled-to-be-replaced-next-year/

DEL CITY, Oklahoma – It could be at least a year before the state can get around to replacing a bad bridge that continues to plague drivers, including rush hour traffic Monday afternoon.

A hole opened up in the westbound lanes of I-40 over Crutcho Creek at some point Monday morning.

The Oklahoma Department of Transportation narrowed traffic down to one lane in order to patch the hole until shortly after 5 p.m.

The bridge, built in 1960 at a time the interstate system was in its infancy, is no stranger to ODOT.

But, the agency has been resigned to keeping the bridge in working order with emergency repairs, until its scheduled replacement sometime next year.

Not long after the bridge was built, the Del City Library moved into the nearby community center in 1966.

Librarian Susan Hutchins wasn’t there at the time, but she is now, helping people navigate the past.

“It’s not just books,” Hutchins said of the library. “It’s programs. It’s computers.”

As the library has kept up with the times, Hutchins said it’s clear the bridge – that carries between 80,000 to 100,000 of vehicles a day – just 200 yards away has not.

“We can’t really see the bridge,” she said, talking near a window on the east side of the building. “But, I know it has problems.”

But, the problem will take time and money.

“We don’t have a lot of (money), for maintenance-type work,” said Cody Boyd, an ODOT spokesperson. “Which is why we’re having to do reactive maintenance, which is waiting until the hole actually forms.”

This isn’t the first time a hole in the bridge has opened up; NewsChannel 4 has done multiple stories about the issue.

The last time crews were out repairing the bridge was February.

Walking below the bridge, along the bike path, you can see exposed re-bar, crumbling concrete, plywood and old street signs used on the bridge deck’s underside to provide backing for the concrete patching from above.

Boyd said the type of work will likely continue until the bridge and nearby Southeast 15th Street bridge can be replaced, a $31 million project slated for 2018.

The design phase is complete, but Boyd said one area of concern is if the agency will face additional budget cuts from the state, considering Oklahoma’s current financial situation.

“That’s why it’s just patchwork, on top of patchwork, on top of patchwork,” Boyd said. “Keep it in good enough condition until we can make it to major reconstruction, and that is the answer for this bridge – to be totally replaced.”

35.442006
-97.440870

http://kfor.com/2017/04/03/youre-only-going-to-hurt-the-average-oklahoman-bill-could-stop-insurance-company-requirement-to-cover-autism/

OKLAHOMA CITY – Last legislative session, lawmakers voted to require insurance companies to cover kids with autism.

Now, a new bill could put a stop to that.

The bill would allow out-of-state insurance companies to sell policies in Oklahoma, but the companies would be exempt from state mandates.

At Autism Awareness Day at the Capitol, some families were concerned the bill could undo what they fought so hard for.

Fourteen-year-old Jimi Scott had quite the day at the capitol, raising autism awareness.

His mom, Emily Scott, is a fierce advocate for insurance reform.

“Today, at the capitol, I met a lot of new providers that are coming in and providing treatment because, now, they know they can get reimbursed properly and, so, parents and families have options,” Emily said.

Jimi was diagnosed with autism 10 years ago.

Last year, Emily and other parents celebrated when lawmakers passed a bill requiring insurance companies to provide coverage for children with autism.

Now, the coverage is in jeopardy.

“This bill will allow out-of-state health carriers to come in and sell bad health insurance plans to individuals in the state of Oklahoma that do not have any mandates in them,” Rep. Collin Walke said.

Walke said SB478 would shake up the health care marketplace.

Out-of-state insurance providers would “not be required to offer or provide state-mandated health benefits required by Oklahoma law.”

The author, Sen. Bill Brown, said the goal is to bring in more providers to the state.

“The reason I’m doing this: we’re trying to lower health care costs and bring in more competition. Right now, Blue Cross and Blue Shield sells 98 percent of health insurance policies in the state of Oklahoma,” Brown said.

Emily said she understands Oklahomans want cheaper insurance but at what cost to those who benefit under the current mandates?

“Applied behavioral analysis is one therapy we had a lot of denials for in Oklahoma and, now, children are able to get that, and it makes such a dramatic difference in their lives,” she said.

“Why in the world would we want to pass a law that unwinds something that helps people? If you undo this, you’re only going to hurt the average Oklahoman, but you’re going to help the insurance companies,” Walke said.

This bill would also affect other medical coverage, like cancer treatment, or any health benefit currently required under the law.

The next stop for the bill is on the House floor.

35.467560
-97.516428

http://kfor.com/2017/04/03/youre-only-going-to-hurt-the-average-oklahoman-bill-could-stop-insurance-company-requirement-to-cover-autism/

OKLAHOMA CITY – Last legislative session, lawmakers voted to require insurance companies to cover kids with autism.

Now, a new bill could put a stop to that.

The bill would allow out-of-state insurance companies to sell policies in Oklahoma, but the companies would be exempt from state mandates.

At Autism Awareness Day at the Capitol, some families were concerned the bill could undo what they fought so hard for.

Fourteen-year-old Jimi Scott had quite the day at the capitol, raising autism awareness.

His mom, Emily Scott, is a fierce advocate for insurance reform.

“Today, at the capitol, I met a lot of new providers that are coming in and providing treatment because, now, they know they can get reimbursed properly and, so, parents and families have options,” Emily said.

Jimi was diagnosed with autism 10 years ago.

Last year, Emily and other parents celebrated when lawmakers passed a bill requiring insurance companies to provide coverage for children with autism.

Now, the coverage is in jeopardy.

“This bill will allow out-of-state health carriers to come in and sell bad health insurance plans to individuals in the state of Oklahoma that do not have any mandates in them,” Rep. Collin Walke said.

Walke said SB478 would shake up the health care marketplace.

Out-of-state insurance providers would “not be required to offer or provide state-mandated health benefits required by Oklahoma law.”

The author, Sen. Bill Brown, said the goal is to bring in more providers to the state.

“The reason I’m doing this: we’re trying to lower health care costs and bring in more competition. Right now, Blue Cross and Blue Shield sells 98 percent of health insurance policies in the state of Oklahoma,” Brown said.

Emily said she understands Oklahomans want cheaper insurance but at what cost to those who benefit under the current mandates?

“Applied behavioral analysis is one therapy we had a lot of denials for in Oklahoma and, now, children are able to get that, and it makes such a dramatic difference in their lives,” she said.

“Why in the world would we want to pass a law that unwinds something that helps people? If you undo this, you’re only going to hurt the average Oklahoman, but you’re going to help the insurance companies,” Walke said.

This bill would also affect other medical coverage, like cancer treatment, or any health benefit currently required under the law.

The next stop for the bill is on the House floor.

35.467560
-97.516428

http://kfor.com/2017/04/03/youre-only-going-to-hurt-the-average-oklahoman-bill-could-stop-insurance-company-requirement-to-cover-autism/

OKLAHOMA CITY – Last legislative session, lawmakers voted to require insurance companies to cover kids with autism.

Now, a new bill could put a stop to that.

The bill would allow out-of-state insurance companies to sell policies in Oklahoma, but the companies would be exempt from state mandates.

At Autism Awareness Day at the Capitol, some families were concerned the bill could undo what they fought so hard for.

Fourteen-year-old Jimi Scott had quite the day at the capitol, raising autism awareness.

His mom, Emily Scott, is a fierce advocate for insurance reform.

“Today, at the capitol, I met a lot of new providers that are coming in and providing treatment because, now, they know they can get reimbursed properly and, so, parents and families have options,” Emily said.

Jimi was diagnosed with autism 10 years ago.

Last year, Emily and other parents celebrated when lawmakers passed a bill requiring insurance companies to provide coverage for children with autism.

Now, the coverage is in jeopardy.

“This bill will allow out-of-state health carriers to come in and sell bad health insurance plans to individuals in the state of Oklahoma that do not have any mandates in them,” Rep. Collin Walke said.

Walke said SB478 would shake up the health care marketplace.

Out-of-state insurance providers would “not be required to offer or provide state-mandated health benefits required by Oklahoma law.”

The author, Sen. Bill Brown, said the goal is to bring in more providers to the state.

“The reason I’m doing this: we’re trying to lower health care costs and bring in more competition. Right now, Blue Cross and Blue Shield sells 98 percent of health insurance policies in the state of Oklahoma,” Brown said.

Emily said she understands Oklahomans want cheaper insurance but at what cost to those who benefit under the current mandates?

“Applied behavioral analysis is one therapy we had a lot of denials for in Oklahoma and, now, children are able to get that, and it makes such a dramatic difference in their lives,” she said.

“Why in the world would we want to pass a law that unwinds something that helps people? If you undo this, you’re only going to hurt the average Oklahoman, but you’re going to help the insurance companies,” Walke said.

This bill would also affect other medical coverage, like cancer treatment, or any health benefit currently required under the law.

The next stop for the bill is on the House floor.

35.467560
-97.516428

http://kfor.com/2017/04/03/divorced-parents-reunite-every-year-to-take-family-photo-for-their-son/

A divorce can be a hard, emotional time for the children involved. However, one couple has gone viral for doing things a bit differently.

Adam Dyson and Victoria Baldwin knew they wanted to make things easier for their son, Bruce, who’s now 4 years old.

So, they decided to keep taking family photos every year.

In a now viral Facebook post on the Love What Matters page, Baldwin included two photos from when they were married and two photos from when they were divorced.

“We are not in love, we don’t always agree, we’re not best friends, sometimes we don’t even like one another,” Baldwin wrote. “But you know what we are? We are forever connected because of our beautiful, smart, kind, compassionate, funny son.”

“Adam and I are not perfect co-parents, but we made a deal when we got divorced, to put our son first and to value the richness that we each bring to his life, for different reasons,” Baldwin added. “So yes, we still have a family portrait taken, and I still pay good money to have the images printed, framed, and placed in our son’s bedroom.”

Even the photo takes some planning now that Dyson lives in South Carolina while Baldwin lives in Alaska, according to People.

Baldwin told CBS News they plan to continue the tradition even after they each find new partners.

“We both agree we’ll continue it,” Baldwin said. “We think a step-parent or long-term partner would be welcomed and would be an addition to Bruce’s life. I have ended potential relationships because they questioned intentions or the quality of Adam and my relationship.”

“We aren’t romantic, but we respect one another. I won’t be with someone who wouldn’t accept that.”

http://kfor.com/2017/04/03/divorced-parents-reunite-every-year-to-take-family-photo-for-their-son/

A divorce can be a hard, emotional time for the children involved. However, one couple has gone viral for doing things a bit differently.

Adam Dyson and Victoria Baldwin knew they wanted to make things easier for their son, Bruce, who’s now 4 years old.

So, they decided to keep taking family photos every year.

In a now viral Facebook post on the Love What Matters page, Baldwin included two photos from when they were married and two photos from when they were divorced.

“We are not in love, we don’t always agree, we’re not best friends, sometimes we don’t even like one another,” Baldwin wrote. “But you know what we are? We are forever connected because of our beautiful, smart, kind, compassionate, funny son.”

“Adam and I are not perfect co-parents, but we made a deal when we got divorced, to put our son first and to value the richness that we each bring to his life, for different reasons,” Baldwin added. “So yes, we still have a family portrait taken, and I still pay good money to have the images printed, framed, and placed in our son’s bedroom.”

Even the photo takes some planning now that Dyson lives in South Carolina while Baldwin lives in Alaska, according to People.

Baldwin told CBS News they plan to continue the tradition even after they each find new partners.

“We both agree we’ll continue it,” Baldwin said. “We think a step-parent or long-term partner would be welcomed and would be an addition to Bruce’s life. I have ended potential relationships because they questioned intentions or the quality of Adam and my relationship.”

“We aren’t romantic, but we respect one another. I won’t be with someone who wouldn’t accept that.”